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Emergency Management closes books on three disasters
By From staff reports

April 26. 2013 9:17AM
South Dakota’s Office of Emergency Management this month completed the paperwork and closed the books on three presidentially declared natural disasters from 2008.

The trio of disasters caused a combined total of nearly $25 million in damages, said Jack Dokken, Ppublic assistance officer for OEM. The events that resulted in the disaster declarations affected dozens of counties and thousands of South Dakota citizens.

“While the immediate response to most disasters is over rather quickly, the process of recovery can take several years,’’ Dokken said. “Our staff is committed to working closely with FEMA and local officials to make sure Public Assistance Program funds are made available to rebuild or repair roads, bridges, power lines and other public infrastructure damaged during the disasters.’’

The recently closed-out disasters included:

• A winter storm with record and near-record snowfall on May 1-2, 2008. The disaster was declared on May 23, 2008. The event caused $10.5 million in damages, including the cost of snow removal and emergency protective measures and the cost of repairing or replacing damaged public facilities. The storm impacted six counties.

• A severe summer storm with widespread flooding during the period June 2-12, 2008. The disaster was declared on July 9, 2008. The event caused $6.4 million in damages, including the cost of emergency work and the cost of repairing or replacing damaged public facilities. The storm impacted 27 counties and parts of three Indian reservations.

• A winter storm with record and near-record snowfall on Nov. 5-7, 2008. The disaster was declared on Dec. 12, 2008. The event caused $8 million in damages, including the cost of repairing or replacing damaged public facilities and infrastructure as well as the cost of snow removal and emergency protective measures. The storm impacted 13 counties and parts of four Indian reservations.

While those disasters have been closed out, the Office of Emergency Management continues to manage nine presidentially declared disasters dating back to 2009.






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